Landmannalaugar is a pearl of the Icelandic interior is situated in a valley between colourful mountains at the dark edge of the rhyolite lava field and the mountains are split with gullies and gorges

It is a geothermal wonderland with steaming sulphur pots in the hills and natural hot springs where people can bathe. But most of all it´s a beautiful place to visit and you should take your time and admire the view and I consider myself a very lucky person to be able to enjoy this on a regular basis

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/13
  3. Exposure: 1/200th
  4. Focal Length: 76mm

Landmannalaugar is an astonishing place, a hot springs area set in a flat gravel plain between a glacial river and the front of a fifteenth-century lava flow

 Landmannalaugar (600m above sea level) includes the largest geothermal field in Iceland outside the Grímsvötn caldera in Vatnajökull. Its weird peaks are made of rhyolite – a mineral-filled lava that cooled unusually slowly, causing those amazing colours

As you can see in this small freshwater stream the rocks are all shades of yellow and  orange with a hint of green 

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/11
  3. Exposure: 1/60th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm

If you ever have the opportunity to visit the island of Flatey you should do so. The island has a seasonal habitation; most houses there are occupied only during summer. In winter, the island’s total population is five people! The island has only the one single road, which leads from the ferry dock to the so-called “old village”, which consists of some beautifully restored and painted old houses of the island’s original inhabitants

On this charming island the time stands still. Most of Flatey´s houses are from the 19th century, so strolling about gives one the impression of travelling back in time. There is a lot of birdlife to enjoy, dolphins can be spotted off the coast and sheep stroll around lazily. 

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/13
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm

When it came to finding a name for this mountain they must have run out of all original ideas….it´s simply called Big green mountain!

This is from the Fjallabak (Behind the mountains)  region that takes its name from the numerous wild and rugged mountains with deeply incised valleys, which are found there. It´s demanding but a popular hiking area with stunning landskape

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/11
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 25mm

The Icelandic mountain areas can be pretty desolate to say the least. Long stretches of black, mossy sands and rocks with mountains on all sides

The roads up there are rough and bumpy and can only be driven on 4x4 and you have to cross few unbridged rivers on the way. However is this a part of a famous trekking rout that is noted for the wide variety of landscapes that are experienced in just 55 km (34 mi). The route is typically completed over 2–4 days with potential stops at some mountain huts on the way and if you look at the larger size of this photo you can see 3 hikers. 

It is a very special feeling to be at places like this where you can walk for hours without seeing anybody. It´s only you and the mountains

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/11
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm
QuestionIs it possible to get a good travel experience in Iceland if you don't speak the language? Obviously it's common courtesy to learn a few things in the language, but is it really difficult to travel if you aren't fluent? Answer

Almost everyone speaks english, at least younger people. So even if you don´t speak a word in the language it´s usually no problem. 

Mt Kirkjufell (Church mountain) is a beautifully shaped and a symmetric, free standing mountain on the northern coastline of the Snaefell’s Peninsula W-Iceland. The creation of the mountain can be traced to the latest cold epoch of the ice age, when the glaciers and their rivers were seriously carving out the landscape and opposite this beautifully shaped mountain we have this lovely waterfall named after the mountain and is called Kirkjufellsfoss. This makes for a stunning view and a great photo opportunity when the conditions are right. This day it was just perfect

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/20
  3. Exposure: 1/40th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm

Mt Tindastoll (995 m) is about 18 km long and shaped like a sharp edge.

 According to the legend every last weekend in June some wishing stones emerge from a small lake on top of the mountain. Since this was taken in late January it was a bit too early for stone searching :) But it was a beautiful day and you could see the snow covered mountains at the other side of the bay gleaming in the winter sun

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/11
  3. Exposure: 1/100th
  4. Focal Length: 42mm

The village of ARNARSTAPI sits at the foot of Mt.Stapafell (526m). It comprises little more than a few holiday cottages and a harbour, The strand between Arnarstapi and Hellnar is of dramatic rugged cliffs and it is fascinating to see how the different forces of nature have shaped this area through the ages

Behind Mt.Stapafell you can see Snæfellsjökull glacier which Verne used as his starting point in his story, Journey to the center of the earth. People from all over the world, believers in the energy radiation of Snaefellsjokull, gather in the area every summer to recharge their “batteries” and rock crystals and some even believe aliens visit from time to time

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/13
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm

Volcanic activity is a rather common thing in Iceland and usually it´s far away from where people live. But in 1973 a eruption started in Westman Island´s biggest island, Heimaey. The volcanic fissure on dry land was originally 1½ km (1 mile) long and situated about 300 m (1,000 feet) to the east of the houses in town of the island. The only pre-warnings of a pending eruption were two waves of earthquakes and no one connected them with what was to come. The inhabitants of Heimaey were woken by the police and firebrigade as they drove around, raising the alarm with their sirens. People streamed down to the docks. Fortunately the weather had been stormy the day before and most of the island´s fleet of 60-70 fishing boats had stayed in harbour. The boats ferried the town´s people to safety at the mainland. 360 houses were buried under ash and lava and many other damaged.

Here I´m standing on the edge of the lava from 1973 where it fell into the ocean and moss and few other plants have started to grow there

This only reminds us that when you live on a volcanic island you have to be prepared for everything

  1. Camera: Nikon D600
  2. Aperture: f/14
  3. Exposure: 1/125th
  4. Focal Length: 17mm